0 Seaport Square Project May Yield Waterfront Library

Rendering of potential Boston waterfront Library in Seaport

Credit: Boston Globe

The Seaport is poised to get a library, but let’s wait to see if it materializes in Boston’s booming commercial real estate sector.

From the Boston Globe:

[State Representative Nick] Collins, a Democrat who represents South Boston, is among those who have complained that the burgeoning district is being built without enough of the places — like a library — that make a neighborhood feel like home. As WS Development finalized plans to put housing, office buildings, and retail on 12.5 acres of parking lots, Collins pressed the developer to add a library to the project, known as Seaport Square.

But when the Boston Planning & Development Agency approved the developer’s plan Nov. 16, it required two performing arts centers, but no library. That same week, however, Collins inserted a provision into a large state bond bill that would set aside $10 million for “creation and construction of a Boston Public Library branch on the South Boston Waterfront.”

0 Is the Seaport Gondola How You’re Getting to Work Tomorrow?

Gondola in city, like Boston

Credit: Curbed Boston

Is getting to work taking too long since your office has moved to Boston Seaport? If so, the Seaport’s solution to your congestion could be a gondola system, according to Boston City Councilor Michael Flaherty.

From Biznow:

Millennium Partners has proposed a Summer Street, cable-propelled gondola network running from South Station to a property one of its subsidiaries owns in the Raymond L. Flynn Marine Park, the Boston Herald reports. As many as 71 10-passenger cabins could move as many as 4,000 passengers per hour in and out of the Seaport, where traffic is notoriously congested.

“A lot of commercial entities are struggling with whether they’re going to renew their leases or they want to come here, because it’s hard to get in and out,” Flaherty said on the Herald’s radio station Wednesday. “The gondola [system] … solves that.”

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Boston Seaport Office Space for Lease

0 Water Transportation Would Suit Seaport District

Ferry in Boston Harbor

Credit: Banker and Tradesman

Water shuttle service simply makes sense to accommodate Boston’s daytime and nighttime population growth and resulting transportation demands. The benefits of water travel from North Station to the Seaport would be a welcome alternative for many within our workforce; complaints of snarled traffic access during business hours are common refrains among Seaport commuters. Additionally, the reactivation of Track 61 from Back Bay to the Seaport will contribute to further traffic relief.

From B&T:

The 2015 South Boston Waterfront Sustainable Transportation Plan specifically recommended ferry service between Fan Pier and North Station, due to the need for improved regional access to the jobs and activity in the Seaport district. The report called water transportation “an untapped resource to open up new channels of transit ridership to/from North Station, the downtown, and coastal communities to the north and south.”

0 Fort Point Pedestrian Bridge to be Restored by GE

Fort Point office buildings

Credit: Boston Globe

GE unveils a glimpse of our industrial past with renderings to the new pedestrian bridge at their new world headquarters in Boston’s Seaport. The new bridge will be used as four separate lounges and quiet working spaces for GE employees.

From the Boston Globe:

Consistent with its historical design, GE expects to keep a green wall on the east side of the bridge. But the bridge’s west side, facing downtown, would look quite different. The windowless facade, currently shielded by corrugated metal, would be replaced with banks of tall windows. The interior — oddly shaped at 40 feet long by 7 feet wide — is to be used as four separate lounges and quiet working spaces for GE employees.

The bridge was once an important link between buildings in the old New England Confectionery Co. complex. But it has long since outlived its original function. It now extends between one of two old brick buildings that GE will occupy and another former Necco building, currently owned by Synergy Investments. The Synergy-owned office building will remain walled off from the GE bridge.

0 Street Parking Rate Increase Across Boston Seaport

Boston parking meter up close

Credit: BBJ

One way to limit cars in the Seaport is to increase the cost to park them. The Seaport hourly rate will see a 25% increase for street parking, and I can only imagine the next rate change will be for surface lots and garages.

“Starting June 5, 20 percent of the total hours that meters cover in the neighborhood will have their maximum rates increase from $2 to $2.50 per hour, according to the city. Meter pricing in the Seaport will now range from $1 to $2.50 per hour,” noted a recent BBJ article.

You can real the full article on the Boston Business Journal, here.

 

0 GE Brands Boston HQ ‘Innovation Point’

GE's seaport HQ, Innovation point

Credit: Boston Business Journal

Where is Innovation Point? If you ask your Uber driver, I imagine you will get a confusing look back at you from the rear view mirror.  If you Google it, it is yet to be clearly defined in Maps other than showing part of the Northern end of the Seaport section of South Boston. Innovation Point is the name selected by GE for their new corporate headquarters in Boston.

Jeff Caywood a GE spokesperson, said the name is a reflection of both the neighborhood and company…The “innovation” piece is reflective of GE’s 125-year history, and the innovative products it has brought to the market — everything from lightbulbs to appliances to jet engines, he said. The “point,” meanwhile, reflects both the Fort Point neighborhood and the “acceleration point” of GE as it transforms into what it has dubbed a “digital industrial” company.

You can read the full article on the BBJ, here.

0 Seaport Tower Initiates Office Leasing

Seaport office tower

Credit: Banker and Tradesman

Looking for space in Boston’s Seaport? 121 Seaport Boulevard, being developed by Skanska, is looking for you. The office building will spread 400,000 square-feet, across 17 floors that are virtually column-free.

From Banker and Tradesman:

Promoted as Boston’s first elliptical tower, the design squeezed efficiencies out of its chilled beam heating and cooling system, said David Nagahiro, a principal at CBT. That eliminated the need for a large fan room in the core space on each floor, enabling nearly 86 percent of each floor to be leasable space.

“This is the most efficient floor plate in the city,” Nagahiro said.

0 Seaport Office Market Expands with Growth of 22 Boston Wharf Rd.

Boston Wharf road office building

Credit: Banker and Tradesman

The Seaport office footprint continues to grow upward. 55,000 square feet is being added to the top of 22 Boston Wharf Road.

According to Banker&Tradesman, “Bentall Kennedy, the real estate manager for landlord Multi-Employer Property Trust, is overseeing construction of two floors of open-format office space totaling 54,712 square feet. Another 55,000 square feet is available on the seventh and eighth floors in space previously occupied by TRO Boston and Red Thread…The space will be ready for tenants to begin interior fitouts as soon as this fall, said David Fitzgerald, a partner at CBRE/New England which is representing ownership.”

The full article is available on the Banker and Tradesman website, here.

0 Globe Photographer Captures Evolution of Boston Waterfront, Seaport

121 Seaport development

Credit: Boston Globe

The evolution of a Seaport submarket through the lens of Boston Globe photographer David L. Ryan from 1982 to present.

According to the Boston Globe, “more than $1.5 billion worth of apartments, condos, storefronts, and office space is under construction in the Seaport right now, all within the span of a few blocks. Another $850 million in projects is set to break ground soon.”

Click over to view a the evolution of the Boston Seaport as captured by the Boston Globe.

0 Social Managers Cultivate Culture, Shape Workplace Environment

Mary Landucci Social Manager at 451 D Street in Boston’s Seaport

Credit: Mary Landucci

Competition breeds a better product and Boston’s office landlords are adding key differentiators. No longer are lobby and common area upgrades the most notable factors when considering a new location for your company. Now tenants might consider items like: Green Factor, Hubway location and Bike Storage, after hours HVAC and Social Managers.

451 D Street in Boston’s Seaport has added Mary Landucci as the Social Manager to assist with coordinating all events for the building.

In an article with Biznow, Landucci notes that “from a recruitment standpoint, it’s become essential for companies, in Boston specifically, to provide their employees with space that caters well to Millennials. My role is a meaningful way for the building landlord to add to that lively, social environment. Also, by having our own building programming as well as a 3,300 SF building lounge, we’re seeking to take some of the pressure off of our tenant companies to be forced to create that space and programming within their own workplace.”

You can read the entire Landucci interview on Biznow’s website.